Hi there

Welcome Guest
We typically reply within minutes
James
Hello! James here from Support team,this is sample text. Original text will display as per app dashboard settings
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane
S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane

    S-2T Silhouette Metal Wall Art, Airplane Silhouette Wall Decor, Metal Aircraft Wall Art, Aviation Wall Decor, Plane

    $151.00
    Shipping calculated at checkout.
      DESCRIPTION

      The Grumman S-2 Tracker (S2F prior to 1962) was the first purpose-built, single airframe anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft to enter service with the United States Navy. Designed and initially built by Grumman, the Tracker was of conventional design — propeller-driven with twin radial engines, a high wing that could be folded for storage on aircraft carriers, and tricycle undercarriage. The type was exported to a number of navies around the world. Introduced in 1952, the Tracker and its E-1 Tracer derivative saw service in the U.S. Navy until the mid-1970s, and its C-1 Trader derivative until the mid-1980s, with a few aircraft remaining in service with other air arms into the 21st century. Argentina and Brazil are the last countries to still use the Tracker.

      Design and development

      Starboard wing root and fold mechanism (note: wing removed)
      The Tracker was intended as a replacement for the Grumman AF Guardian,[1] which was the first purpose-built aircraft system for anti-submarine warfare. The Guardian operated in two aircraft "hunter-killer" pairs, with one aircraft (the AF2-W) carrying the detection gear to find the submarine and to direct the second aircraft, the AF-2S, which carried weapons to attack and destroy the submarine.[2] The Tracker combined both functions in one aircraft, saving deck space aboard carriers and making for more efficient operations.[1] Grumman's design (model G-89) was for a large high-wing monoplane with twin Wright Cyclone R-1820 nine cylinder radial engines, a yoke type arrestor hook and a crew of four. Both the two XS2F-1 prototypes and 15 S2F-1 production aircraft were ordered at the same time, on 30 June 1950. The first flight was conducted on 4 December 1952, and production aircraft entered service with VS-26, in February 1954.

      Follow-on versions included the WF Tracer and TF Trader, which became the Grumman E-1 Tracer and Grumman C-1 Trader in the tri-service designation standardization of 1962. The S-2 carried the nickname "Stoof" (S-two-F) throughout its military career; and the E-1 Tracer variant with the large overhead radome was colloquially called the "stoof with a roof.".[3]

      Grumman produced 1,185 Trackers and another 99 aircraft carrying the CS2F designation were manufactured in Canada under license by de Havilland Canada. U.S.-built versions of the Tracker were sold to various nations, including Australia, Japan, Turkey and Taiwan.

      REVIEWS

      RECENTLY VIEWED PRODUCTS

      BACK TO TOP